Teaching round-up

We really don’t post enough about our teaching activites here. It’s really a blast to teach elementary kids, because, well, the cliches are true. Kids are empty sponges soaking up stuff, and it’s fun to watch them squeeze knowledge back out once in a while. So, here’s a few things we did over the last few months.

Summer camp!
Akasha made a comic retelling an Anansi story for her students to read and had her students make animated gifs to retell the Anansi story, Why Anansi Has Long Legs. Here’s the link: http://anansihaseightlegs.tumblr.com/

Mike did videos for “It’s a small World” with his 4th graders. Their illustrations turned out great, and the video was fun to make, though I regret that the pictures are a bit hard to see.

I (Mike) also worked with the fifth graders to make stick-puppet illustrations for “The Princess and the Dragon!” I’m pretty proud of my kids for being able to work through my bad instructions, and of myself for figuring out how iMovie works.

Field Trips

Several weeks ago, Mike went with his sixth graders to the ice rink in

Me, not falling down!

Gwangju. Now, Koreans aren’t known for their ice skating, (Kim Yuna excepted) and most of the kids hadn’t skated much, if at all. But, kids are troopers. So, we all got in a bus at 9 in the morning and made the 45 minute ride up to the World Cup Soccer complex, which has an ice rink, an archery center, and an equestrian pavilion. We skated for a couple of hours, where after getting my skating legs back (it had been a while) I showed off my Minnesota skate chops. Go Gophers!

Yay!

Akasha also went on the 6th grade class field trip.  We began the day with a short ride on a very modified turtle boat into the bay and a walk along the estuary. Later we had a picnic and played in the park for over an hour of free play.  Finally, we went to this beautiful traditional motel that I’d love to stay at (hint. hint.) They were divided into two sections. One section had a tea ceremony class, the other half  had a how to make tea candies.  It was very cute.  I enjoyed watching and learning. I could pick up little bits in Korean.  If you’d like to try a tea ceremony, you can make a reservation at the Como Tea House. It is a Japanese tea ceremony, but there is a lot of overlap.

Fancy Tea Party on Akasha’s field trip

School Festival
We posted last year about the school festival, so this is to say, it happened again. It was just as cute and intense as last year, but this time Mike got out his video camera and recorded snippets from each of the acts. Here it is:

Class Projects

The whole crew

Halloween is not a real thing here. You can find a couple of masks and pumpkin shaped mini buckets at the markets, but they don’t have costume parties, dress up, trick-or-treat, or do any of that stuff.  My 6th grade book focuses on western culture by having an awkward chapter on inviting people to house warming parties, pajama parties, and Halloween parties. It is very strange to have 30 kids talking about party invitations when they don’t know anything about the party.  So I gave them a primer on Halloween parties, then we made invitations. Here are some of the top. (psst, if you ask my students about their birthday parties, they hung out with one friend. Very different.)

The new kindergarten teacher and I have been collaborating on teaching paralel themes.  She taught about Halloween this October, so I had a trick-or-treat party for them. It was great.  Some of my social 6th graders stopped by to visit that day and saw me making party favors and volunteered to help out.  They were priceless.  We made ghost suckers, witch hat cookies, treat baggies, pin the nose on the witch, and a bobbing for apples station.  It was fantastic.  Getting 22 Kindergartners to trick-or-treat and play two games would have been impossible otherwise. It was a fantastic, exhausting day.

Fall in Jeollanam-do

I love fall in Korea. It is warmer, sunnier, and drier than fall in MN. It is also beautiful.  We are also 12° south of MN , and in dry season so, unfortunately, we don’t have all the amazing leaf colors MN does.  But we have lots of other colors. It is beautiful here.  You probably remember my posting about how I (Akasha) walk past a fig orchard on the way to work?  Well, they are beautiful in fall.  Green, purple, brown, they literally burst open on the trees. It is so cool.  I’ve been learning to cook with them, making fig liquor, jam, figs and pork, fig muffins, fig bread…

fig brusting in the sun

There are beautiful flowers late into the fall/ early winter.  Roses and Camillas are still blooming.  There are lots of pretty white, purple, and pink flowers. I really love the orange flowers, they kind of look like California Poppies. Another fruit all over Korea that we don’t see in MN is persimmon.  I don’t think they taste like much, but they are beautiful. We had a few typhoons late in the year and they knocked the fruit off of most of the trees along our coast, but we saw some big trees full of fruit on our road trip.  Many farmers planted them along side the orange flowers.  They are so beautiful.  I wish I could bring this scene back home. If you look carefully at the pic on the left you can see the juice running down underneath the orange persimmon.

persimmon dripping with juice

Persimmons on the river bank

Chestnuts are everywhere too. They are falling off of the trees.  Vendors roast them on the street with what looks like chickory.  It smells great, but I’m not much for the taste.  Maybe if they were salted…

Chestnuts

The markets are full of all sorts of great stuff this time of year. It is a great time to go shopping. Since you cant be here to see it, I thought I’d share some of our pictures.

A few more blogs coming up will talk about our favorite fall foods, weekend road trips, and more school stuff. We miss you guys.  We love it when you comment, it is like keeping in touch and motivates us to write more.

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